How to Tell if You’re Working For A Bad Boss and What To Do About It

So many motivated go-getters are stuck working for people who may never promote them, highlight their competencies and empower them toward greater opportunities. As a Leadership Advisor, I’m so passionate about sharing my tips on how to prevent yourself from being derailed by leaders who may not have the authentic desire to nurture and advance your skills for professional development.

Employees under these bosses stop doing everything they can to contribute to the company—while staying put, just to get their paycheques. They essentially unofficially quit because they don’t see progression, empowerment or appreciation. Bosses who possess the behaviours below will likely lose talented and competent employees and lead broken teams that don’t collaborate.

Here are a few ways to spot a Bad Boss

1. They don’t hire exceptional, smart, competent people

Make sure you work for an environment that is filled with leaders who want to empower talented and bright people instead of hiring people they can keep down, mainly, so they won’t be challenged or threatened in their own roles. Make sure your leaders are ready to not only hire smart and competent people but also present them with challenging opportunities to display their abilities.

2. They divide their own team members

You might be the “team member of the month”, but not for long. By creating favourites, these types of bosses alienate the rest of the team from collaborating and bonding with each other. Keep an eye out for this behaviour and if this is happening to you and your colleagues, make extra effort to unite with your team and get them to recognize the attempt at the division.

3. Those who don’t openly give credit and highlight their team member’s talents

We all get a thank you in private when we do good work, we often hear things like “thanks, you saved me with this project” or “thank you so much for staying until 8pm last night I am so lucky to have you on the team”. But does it stop there or is that leader making sure the higher-ups know about your contribution? If you don’t hear from other leaders about your performance once in a while and feel as though your boss tries to keep a low profile of your talents, chances are that nobody has heard of your accomplishments. This is dangerous as if your boss ever gets transferred, fired or takes a better position somewhere else, your impressive record goes with them.

Contributor: Elizabeth Dulberger, Leadership Advisor
Photo by rawpixel.com on Unsplash

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